Commentary of Fr. Jesús Fernández to the Gospel of Sunday November 7 (Lk 20, 27-38)

Today the Church invites us to meditate on the resurrection, on account of a dialogue between Christ and a group of Sadducees. The Sadducees do not believe in the resurrection of the dead, and they want to put Jesus in a difficult position with a tricky question. The argument that Jesus gives is that the Lord is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. God is not a God of the dead but of the living.

The mystery of the resurrection is that being the baptized children of the Father, we inherit the resurrection by grace with Christ and in Christ.

In the Creed we say “I believe in the Holy Spirit, in the Holy Catholic Church, and in the resurrection of the dead.”

The God who is revealed by Christ is a Father who loves us one by one, really madly loves us. As Pope Francis says: we carry the Father’s DNA in our spirits, in our hearts; a Father who always follows us, looks at us with a look of love, tenderness, delicacy and immense respect. Human beings play life with a single card. The Father does not play with his children, he takes them very seriously.

Every human being has a history, has his dignity and a continuous awareness of being the child of a Heavenly Father.

We should live as true children of the Father. This is our greatness, the challenge and the commitment of our existence. The Father has created us to be free, happy and joyful. Death can end our biological condition but our love for the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit is not extinguished. The Creator of life is stronger than death.

The God we believe in is not a God of the dead but of the living, of living people, as Abraham, Isaac and Jacob were.

Eternal life, the evangelist says, is “to remain in his love.” The love of God never dies, it transforms from best to best.

What the Church pours on us, like a waterfall, is the joy of the risen Christ, who never abandons us. He who humbled himself to the cross, who lived a human life similar to ours, who is “sitting at the right hand of the Father,” today is our peace and our joy. It is the triumph of life. He is a perfect man and perfect God. He is not a ghost, he whom the apostles lived with. He is the Living One par excellence: “I have overcome the world” (Jn 16,33).

Christ reconciles us with Him and brings us into his glory.

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